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Title: Exactly When Was Jesus Born? Not on December 25.
Source: Foodforthethinkers.com
URL Source: http://wp.me/p13mHb-i1
Published: Dec 24, 2013
Author: Douglas F. Newman
Post Date: 2013-12-24 22:24:43 by snoopdougg
Keywords: None
Views: 977
Comments: 31

Jesus was not born on December 25.

More likely, he was born in September.

Full article here: wp.me/p13mHb-i1

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#1. To: snoopdougg (#0)

Nowhere in Scripture does it mention when Jesus was born. Christmas has nothing to do with Jesus. Christ mas literally means "the death of Christ". And in Scripture the Lord actually looks at the celebration of such a season as an abomination. Here in Scripture is where it is noted where Christ hates the Nicolaitians (promoters of St. Nicholas-Santa Claus) see Revelations 2:6 and 15

the decking of fir trees with silver and gold is an unholy act which the Lord also abhores. See Jeremiah 10:2-4

Christmas honors not the birth of Jesus Christ but honors instead Tammuz. See Ezekial 8:14

Have a blessed evening.

purplerose  posted on  2013-12-24   22:35:31 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#10. To: purplerose (#1)

interesting..

the Santa myth has always bothered me. i never perpetuated the silly lie to my son that some old man climbed down our non existent chimney, to give him gifts. why should a stranger get the credit for the gifts that i and his father generously and lovingly chose for him?

christine  posted on  2013-12-26   10:17:37 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#15. To: christine (#10)

The Santa myth began bothering me when I was in the 3rd grade and would get christmas cards from faculty and staff with the words "Merry X-mas" and the other cards reading "Merry Christmas". This not only bothered me but confused me. I would wonder about the "X-mas" part a lot. Of course, when I would ask my folks of such meanings they would have no explanation for the reason X-mas is on my cards. So, throughout the years I felt like a complete dummy for not being able to fully understand this all until I (age 12) discovered it was all a lie. I had to do the searching for myself. It's one thing to keep your kids innocent but its still another when you enslave them with myths and lies like this.

purplerose  posted on  2013-12-26   12:25:12 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#20. To: purplerose (#15) (Edited)

The Santa myth began bothering me when I was in the 3rd grade and would get christmas cards from faculty and staff with the words "Merry X-mas" and the other cards reading "Merry Christmas". This not only bothered me but confused me. I would wonder about the "X-mas" part a lot. Of course, when I would ask my folks of such meanings they would have no explanation for the reason X-mas is on my cards. So, throughout the years I felt like a complete dummy for not being able to fully understand this all until I (age 12) discovered it was all a lie. I had to do the searching for myself. It's one thing to keep your kids innocent but its still another when you enslave them with myths and lies like this.

Xmas - Wikipedia | Chi-Rho/XP/XPI Pic: The labarum, often called the Chi-Rho, is a Christian symbol representing Christ

The "-mas" part is from the Latin-derived Old English word for Mass, [My note: like "Go, you are sent."] while the "X" comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word [...] which comes into English as "Christ". [...] This X and P [Rho] arose as the uppercase forms of the Greek letters [...] (Greek for "Christ"), and are still widely seen in many Eastern Orthodox icons depicting Jesus Christ. The labarum, an amalgamation of the two Greek letters rendered as ☧, is a symbol often used to represent Christ in Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox Christian Churches.

Santa is a cultural story symbolic of humanity; based on the gift-giving of the Three Wisemen at the Nativity (the likely traditional origins of our birthday celebrations culturally with gift-giving, as well) and on St. Nicholas of Myra, Turkey (not Nicolaitians/Nicolaitans/sp?, referenced at Posts #1 and #3, which aren't about St. Nicholas at all). More on St. Nicholas at Post #24.

Edited last two paragraphs + spacing.

GreyLmist  posted on  2013-12-27   21:42:22 ET  (1 image) Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


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