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Title: Chicago prosecutor Kim Foxx's office has dismissed more than 25,000 felony cases - including murders, shootings, sexual assaults
Source: [None]
URL Source: http://www.yourdestinationnow.com/2 ... op-chicago-prosecutor-kim.html
Published: Aug 11, 2020
Author: Chris Menahan
Post Date: 2020-08-11 08:19:35 by Horse
Keywords: None
Views: 14
Comments: 1

Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx has dismissed more than 25,000 felony cases - including many involving charges of murder and other serious crimes - in her first three years on the job, a new report shows.

Foxx gained notoriety last year when she dropped felony charges against Jussie Smollett, the Empire actor accused of staging a racist, homophobic attack on himself in January 2019.

The Chicago Tribune on Monday published an analysis of Foxx's overall record on dropping charges, revealing that she has done so at a rate that's 35 percent higher than her predecessor.

In the first three years after Foxx took over as Cook County's top prosecutor in 2016, her office dismissed all charges against 29.9 percent of felony defendants, the Tribune found.

By comparison, Foxx's predecessor Anita Alvarez dropped charges against just 19.4 percent of felony defendants over her last three years in office.

A total of 25,183 defendants had their felony charges dismissed under Foxx up until November 2019, compared with 18,694 under Alvarez during a similar period, the Tribune said.

Foxx took over as state's attorney in 2016 with a promise to bring criminal justice reform and to reduce the population of Cook County Jail.

The Democrat is now up for re-election in November after beating three challengers in a tight race that was one of the most expensive of its kind.

Foxx defended her case dismissal record in an interview with the Tribune prior to the publication of its analysis.

The newspaper reported that Foxx did not dispute the findings, but said that the high rate of dismissal gave an 'incomplete picture of her commitment to keeping the public safe'.

'It is always eye-opening to be able to look at our own data and compare it to my predecessor's past,' Foxx said. 'I can't reconcile what her decision-making was, and how they chose to (dismiss) cases in the past. 'But I will say that this administration has been clear that our focus would be on violent crime and making sure that our resources and attention would go to addressing violent crime.'

Foxx asserted that her office has focused on dropping cases against low-level, nonviolent offenders - though the Tribune's analysis paints a different picture.

It found that Foxx has consistently dismissed cases involving murder, shootings, sex crimes and serious drug offenses at a significantly higher rate than Alvarez did.

Below is a breakdown of dismissal rates for different felony crimes under Foxx and Alvarez:

Homicide cases: Foxx - 8.1 percent, Alvarez - 5.3 percent

Sex crimes: Foxx - 9.5 percent, Alvarez - 6.5 percent

Aggravated battery: Foxx - 7 percent, Alvarez - 5.9 percent

Narcotics: Foxx - 53.8 percent, Alvarez - 34.5 percent

Foxx gained notoriety when she dropped felony charges against Jussie Smollett (pictured), the Empire actor accused of staging a racist, homophobic attack on himself in January 2019

Foxx's handling of the Smollett case has been a key issue in her campaign for re-election this fall. She is pictured at a rally after winning the Democratic nomination in March

Foxx said she encourages assistant state's attorneys in her office to openly discuss dismissing felony charges with cases that have legal problems.

She said fostering that kind of environment is important to her given Chicago's record of wrongful convictions and police misconduct. 'Recognizing the history that we've had around wrongful convictions, recognizing our ethical obligations as prosecutors ... requires us to reinforce that people can, if they believe a case is flawed, bring it to our attention, and we will dismiss it if it's appropriate,' she said. Foxx also said she is more selective about prosecuting the strongest, most winnable cases - though the Tribune's analysis showed that her overall conviction rate (66 percent) is lower than Alvarez's (75 percent).

Foxx drew intense criticism last year after she recused herself from the Smollett investigation and her office dismissed all 16 felony charges against the actor.

Though Foxx had removed herself from the investigation prior to the charges being dropped, questions remained about whether she acted improperly by speaking to a Smollett relative and aide to former first lady Michelle Obama before the dismissal.

Last summer a Cook County judge appointed a special prosecutor, former US Attorney Dan Webb, to investigate whether any misconduct occurred in Foxx's office's handling of the case.

Foxx drew intense criticism last year after she recused herself from the Smollett investigation and her office dismissed all 16 felony charges against the actor. Protesters are seen demanding her removal in Chicago on April 1, 2019

Foxx denounced Webb's appointment, saying that it was unnecessary to bring in a special prosecutor when the county's inspector general was already looking into the case.

But Webb's investigation proved very influential as it led to a grand jury indicting Smollett on new charges in February. Those charges, which were ridiculed by Foxx, are nearly identical to the ones her office dismissed.

Webb said that the decision to drop charges was unjustified in part because the evidence against Smollett seemed overwhelming and because he was not required to admit that the attack was a hoax.

The new charges threatened to bring down Foxx's campaign for re-election as her opponents repeatedly used her perceived mistake as ammunition. But Foxx overcame the opposition and won the Democratic nomination in March.

'There was an effort to make this election about one big case involving a celebrity,' she said in her victory speech. 'The voters have overwhelmingly put that fallacy to rest.'

Webb's determination on whether Foxx's office engaged in misconduct in the Smollett case has yet to be released.

If it comes before the November election and contains damaging conclusions, Foxx could be facing another hard battle to keep her position.

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#1. To: Horse (#0) (Edited)

Narcotics:

When living in Chicago in late 70s, this girl that lived across the street who was in High School came to my front door with her girlfriend. She told me some guy tried to pick her up when walking home alone.

I told them, "Let's go and we will look for this guy."

We hop into my Blazer and take off toward the High School. We spot him a few blocks from High School. I pull a U-turn and get behind him. He pulls over on 4-lane near phone company building and waits for traffic to come and pulls out in front of them.

I had to wait for a few cars to go past, but I caught him at gas station next to Post Office 4 blocks away.

The two guys in the gas station didn't make a move.

The girls got his tag number. I told them, "Write it down right now and give it to Rick, the school cop (SRO).

They found out he lived right across from the High School. So they put a good looking blond lady cop out front.

He comes popping out the door and sees her. He walks up to her and says, "Hey baby, let's go upstairs and we can smoke a joint."

She gives the signal and they bust him. They go upstairs and find weed. He is sitting in the shitter when I find out about it.

So I ell the guys in the hood, "Get some ball bats and let's go."

We all jump into my Blazer and take off toward the school. I point out the car and go around the block. They jump out of the truck and take the windows out of the car all the way around. Then they run and jump back in the truck.

I see this guy again a month or two later doing the same thing, hitting on chicks walking alone down the street.

He pulls over on street corner to get out of his car. I have his chick in the truck with me and I tell her, "Get down!"

I pull up alongside him and holler, "I see you are still up to your old tricks!" And I was out of there.

People like that do not change. And if he has been in prison, they get rid of molesters in there pretty quick. ROTFLOL

"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one." Edmund Burke

BTP Holdings  posted on  2020-08-11   13:32:21 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


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