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Retro 50s 60s
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Title: Still
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URL Source: [None]
Published: Jun 22, 2023
Author: Whisperin' Bill Anderson - singer
Post Date: 2023-06-22 15:59:34 by Lod
Keywords: None
Views: 3146
Comments: 75

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#1. To: All (#0)

Lod  posted on  2023-06-22   16:54:01 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#2. To: Lod (#1)

Esso  posted on  2023-06-22   17:11:45 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#3. To: Esso (#2)

Nice! thank you.

Reminded me of this one, as time winds down...

Lod  posted on  2023-06-22   18:34:48 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#4. To: Lod (#3)

...as time winds down...

I washed my truck Tuesday afternoon for the first time in about two years. Of course, that had my back out of commission yesterday and on the narcotics. I'd be having the time of my life if it wasn't for the pain. My excitement now consists of giving away money and drinkin'. Anyway, the truck looks good. It ought to, it's got less than 11k miles after ten and a half years.

FWIW, John Denver died at 53 in 1997 He died on the afternoon of October 12, 1997, when his light homebuilt aircraft, a Rutan Long-EZ with registration number N555JD, crashed into Monterey Bay near Pacific Grove, California, while making a series of touch-and-go landings at the nearby Monterey Peninsula Airport.

Esso  posted on  2023-06-22   19:21:10 ET  (1 image) Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#5. To: Esso (#4)

Why would a pilot make a series of touch-and-go landings? Practice? Fun? Testing the aircraft?

StraitGate  posted on  2023-06-22   19:31:01 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#6. To: StraitGate (#5) (Edited)

I don't remember the details. JD had plenty of hours, the aircraft was a homebuilt/experimental deal. Maybe he was trying to get used to it, I don't really know.

Back in 2013, I was getting ready to get my rotary wing license. I wanted to finish up my Texas Two-Step lessons at the American Legion in Waynedale first.

Texting Granny irrevocably changed my destiny on 26Nov2013.

Esso  posted on  2023-06-22   19:39:28 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#7. To: Esso (#6)

The engine quit on John Denver's plane for running out of gas. It had a switch controlling which tank it drew gas from but in an unusual spot, I think above and behind the shoulder which was a customized location, and for some reason, one tank ran dry. So the crash was not any fault with the aircraft's avionics or general design.

Pinguinite  posted on  2023-06-22   20:43:19 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#10. To: Pinguinite (#7)

Is the engine in a small aircraft like that easy to re-start in flight? What turns the engine to re-start it? Air over the prop? An electric starter like a car?

StraitGate  posted on  2023-06-22   21:06:24 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#12. To: StraitGate (#10)

Is the engine in a small aircraft like that easy to re-start in flight? What turns the engine to re-start it? Air over the prop? An electric starter like a car?

The vast majority of aircraft in the modern age can be re-started in- flight as they have battery power to do that. I can only think of the WW1 style radial engine types that relied on someone cranking the prop to start it. But of course you also need enough altitude to give you time to be able to react to an engine outage, determine the cause, remedy and restart it, and I think Denver was at too low an altitude to do all those things.

Pinguinite  posted on  2023-06-22   21:21:42 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#18. To: Pinguinite (#12)

Interesting. Thanks.

StraitGate  posted on  2023-06-22   22:09:53 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


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